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porn_rage's Journal

Name:
Feminists In Protest of Pornography
Membership:
Moderated
Posting Access:
All Members
FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT TO JOIN:

Please note that users with new journals with no visible entries will be rejected from membership unless the user emails the moderators with an explanation. We recieve countless membership requests from trolls who want to enter this community to harass us and they generally masquerade as new users with seemingly sympathetic interest lists. Please email us if you want to be included but your journal has no substance. If your request has been rejected feel free to email us with questions.

This is a community for feminists in protest of pornography. Our core reasons for protesting pornography may vary. Our definitions of porn may vary, too. But, for the purposes of moderation, this community relies upon Catherine MacKinnon’s and Andrea Dworkin’s statutory definition of pornography, as follows:

CATHARINE MACKINNON’S AND ANDREA DWORKIN’S
STATUTORY DEFINITION OF PORNOGRAPHY
(from the Indianapolis ordinance at issue in American Booksellers, Inc. v. Hudnut)

"Pornography" under the ordinance is "the graphic sexually explicit subordination of women, whether in pictures or in words, that also includes one or more of the following:
(1) Women are presented as sexual objects who enjoy pain or humiliation; or
(2) Women are presented as sexual objects who experience sexual pleasure in being raped; or
(3) Women are presented as sexual objects tied up or cut up or mutilated or bruised or physically hurt, or as dismembered or truncated or fragmented or severed into body parts; or
(4) Women are presented as being penetrated by objects or animals; or
(5) Women are presented in scenarios of degradation, injury abasement, torture, shown as filthy or inferior, bleeding, bruised, or hurt in a context that makes these conditions sexual; or
(6) Women are presented as sexual objects for domination, conquest, violation, exploitation, possession, or use, or through postures or positions of servility or submission or display."
Indianapolis Code § 16-3(q). The statute provides that the "use of men, children, or transsexuals in the place of women in paragraphs (1) through (6) above shall also constitute pornography under this section."


This community arises from the need to provide a safe space from the various forms of victim/participant-hate found in anti-pornography debate communities.

Below, we have included some concepts to consider when deciding whether you want to participate:


1. If you consider feminist criticism of sexual material to be prudish, you may not feel comfortable here. "If you don't like it, don't look at it" isn't sufficient to address our concerns. On the other side of the issue, just because we criticize representations of sex in various media, does not mean we criticize sexual acts between consenting adults across the board in any way, or representations of the human body. Please be careful to note this distinction: if you are uncomfortable with any discussion of sex, you may not find this to be the community for you.

2. On "anti-sex" and "pro-sex": These terms create a false dichotomy and only serve to alienate feminists from one another. This community does not endorse the use of these terms in discussion and particularly not as a pejorative. An essay on the topic.

3. In the current western culture, there is nothing sexually radical about accepting pornography. Pornography is now in the mainstream of culture, and needs to be addressed just as feminism addresses non-sexual images of women in the media.

4. This community is NOT interested in censorship as a solution to the problem of pornography. We seek alternative answers such as accountability, regulation of the industry, extensive reform of the industry, sex education, and other pathways to end exploitation.

5. Freedom to choose. We can all agree on this simple goal. However, we are also willing to admit that not every choice is a feminist choice. Free choice alone is not a valid defense for a person's or group's actions.

6. The link between Marxist/socialist feminism and porn will probably be made. Critiques of capitalism and free market as they relate to the role of the worker and the balance of power in a capitalist economy are welcome here.

7. The moderators also consider this a forum which lends support to people who encounter pornography and we seek to explore ways to handle the situation, particularly if it is hostile. We want to support people who are anti-pornography, particularly in those situations where those views are the most maligned.

7(a). We do not exist to condemn sex workers. And we will not tolerate the condemnation of sex-workers in this community. We recognise that sex workers are sometimes -- although not always -- victims of economic circumstance. We exist in protest of the sex work industry itself -- NOT THE SEX WORKERS THEMSELVES.

8. We shouldn't have to defend the concept of objectification and the effect it has on women. No one needs to point out that men are objectified too, raped too, etc. If you don't understand the concept of patriarchy then this might not be the community for you.


Here are some links which display several feminist stances on pornography. It would be better if you became familiar with the stance before participating in discussion here.


One Angry Girl
Robert Jensen Article 1
Robert Jensen Article 2
Diana Russel's Page
No Status Quo (including info on Nikki Craft)
Pornography and the First Amendment

SAFE SPACE RULES:



1. No personal insults on any individuals be they members of this community or not.

2. This is a safe space for women, feminists, and anyone who identifies as female, as well as every sexuality and gender.

3. We don’t appreciate it when someone calls us out in a community or journal, and we bet you don’t either. It is in this spirit that we recommend no posts are made that link specifically to another individual’s journal or another specific post. We recommend posting your gripes about the content in general, not the poster in specific.

4. We recognize that the 'isms' work together to create all the things that piss us off. In short: no racist, sexist, homophobic, classist, or transphobic statments.

5. If you are a member of a privileged group, be prepared for your privilege to be checked if necessary.

6. No posting pornography. It can be extremely triggering. If you object to specific material that you have found and want to discuss that, put your text description behind a cut.

7. Remember that pornography is often a tool used in sexual abuse. We will allow no criticism or indictment of survivors' experiences from within or without the field of sex work. If you have been hurt by the sex industry, we make this a safe space for you. If you have been in the sex industry, we will also make this a safe space for you.

GENERAL RULES:



1. No spam or quizzes. Please try to stay on topic.

2. Long posts require an lj-cut tag. Use your judgement here. The instructions on how to lj-cut are here.

3. No disabling comments on posts. All posts are required to be comment-enabled. If you don’t want to hear what anyone else has to say, the post is probably more appropriate for your personal journal.

4. Deleting comments, yours or someone else’s, is highly discouraged. We encourage all our members to take responsibility for their comments and posts, and to think before they hit send. If you find a particular comment problematic, contact the moderators and if they feel it is necessary, they will delete away.

5. This is a closed community. Since the stance of anti-pornography is so controversial, it attracts lots of trolls. So the moderators will review applicants.

6. thus_spoke_zara and snidegrrl are your moderators. They will not hesitate to delete posts or ban based on the rules set out in this info. We’ll try to make sure to alert the membership for the reasons for banning and allow comment.


You can contact them at "porn_rage {at} peril [dot] org" and "thus_spoke_zara@livejournal.com".
2nd wave feminism, activism, andrea dworkin, animal rights, anti porn, anti pornography, anti-anorexia, anti-discrimination, anti-economic-violence, anti-male-privilege, anti-patriarchy, anti-porn, anti-porn industry, anti-porn-industry, anti-pornography, anti-racism, anti-rape, anti-sexual-violence, antibeauty standards, blurring the gender line, body image, catherine mackinnon, child pornography, civil rights, commodification, cosmetic surgery, double standards, egalitarian, egalitarianism, empowerment, erotica, female gender-socialisation, feminism, feminists, fetish, fetishizing, gender, gloria steinem, grrls, guerilla girls, human dignity, human rights, human trafficking, inga muscio, jackson katz, male gender-socialisation, media, naomi wolf, nikki craft, no status quo, objectification, oppression, pain, patriarchy, pedophiles, plastic surgery, pop culture, porn, pornography, programming, progressive politics, prostitution, racial stereotyping, racism, radical feminism, rage, rape, rape culture, rapists, realistic sex education, riot grrrl, robert jensen, safe space, self-esteem, sex, sex ed, sex education, sex industry, sex role stereotyping, sex roles, sex trafficking, sex work, sexism, sexual assault, sexual availability, sexual equality, sexual harrassment, sexual health, sexual obsession, sexual slavery, sexuality, socialization, stereotypes, stop child pornography, women, women in politics, women's community, women's health, women's rights, women's studies, womyn

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